One-Minute Book Reviews

March 17, 2009

‘Passive suffering is not a theme for poetry’ (Quote of the Day / W. B. Yeats)

Members of an isolated British reading group write letters about their favorite books in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (Dial, 2008), a bestselling novel set mainly on a Channel Island in 1946. But one character rages against William Butler Yeats, the Irish Nobel laureate. The complaint: Yeats edited The Oxford Book of Modern Verse, 1892–1935 and said in its introduction that he had left out all the great World War I poets, including Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, because

“ … passive suffering is not a theme for poetry.”

This well-known quote was controversial from the start. But it suggests how much poetry has changed: Many recent collections, such as Frances Richey’s The Warrior and Mary Jo Bang’s Elegy, include poems that involve “passive suffering.”

What do you think of the change? Does poetry need less passive suffering and more active engagement with life? Or are modern poets proving that Yeats was wrong?

Read Yeats’s full quote and more on The Oxford Book of Modern Verse, 1892–1935 www.english.emory.edu/LostPoets/Yeats.html.

A review of and reading group guide to The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society appeared on this site on Nov. 25, 2008 www.oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2008/11/25/. A review of The Warrior was posted on July 27 www.oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2008/07/27/ and of Elegy on March 10 www.oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2008/03/10/.

nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1923/yeats-bio.html

© 2008 Janice Harayda. All rights reserved.
www.janiceharayda.com

September 7, 2008

London Bookies’ Favorites for 2008 Man Booker Prize Shortlist

Filed under: Book Awards,News — 1minutebookreviewswordpresscom @ 11:02 pm
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UPDATE, Sept. 9, 2008, 3:30 p.m.: After the shortlist was announced today, London bookies listed the odds for the eventual winner of the prize: William Hill has named Sebastian Barry the 2-1 favorite to win the Man Booker Prize in October. The odds-makers at Ladbroke’s called Aravind Adiga the favorite with Linda Grant close behind www.themanbookerprize.com/news/stories/1136.

Netherland has 3-to-1 odds in its favor with a leading betting agency

Was it Hurricane Gustav? In my wisdom I didn’t think to Google “bookies’ favorites” + “2008 Man Booker” + “shortlist” before predicting that Joseph O’Neill’s novel Netherland would waltz into the final six on Tuesday. Now that I’ve hit the “Search” button, it seems that I am far from alone in my view. In fact, it appears that only people who don’t think Netherland will make the shortlist are those who think that “God Save the Queen” is the national anthem of Venezuela. But even with the 3-to-1 odds in his favor, O’Neill will be far from a sure bet to win if he makes the finals. He was born in Ireland and an Irish writer, Anne Enright, won last year. And he’s become a U.S. citizen, which could work against him if the judges are among the many Brits whose favorite insult for the former prime minister was to call him “President Blair.”

Note: Other favorites of those placing bets with the William Hill agency, in order, include Salman Rushdie’s The Enchantress of Florence, Tom Rob Smith’s Child 44, Sebastian Barry’s The Secret Scripture and Linda Grant’s The Clothes on Their Backs. Click here for the bookies’ odds on all the titles on the Booker longlist announced in July
www.themanbookerprize.com/news/stories/1108.

Update: After William Hill posted its list, the Ladbroke’s betting agency released a list that named Rushdie the favorite and ranked O’Neill third. Read the Ladbroke’s list here www.themanbookerprize.com/news/stories/1111. Rushdie won the 1981 Booker for Midnight’s Children.

© 2008 Janice Harayda. All rights reserved.

2008 Man Booker Prize Finalists To Be Named Tuesday — Jan the Hungarian Predicts That ‘Netherland’ Will Make the Shortlist

The latest in an occasional series of posts in which Janice Harayda, a former vice-president for awards of the National Book Critics Circle, predicts the winners of or finalists for major book awards*

The six finalists for the 2008 Man Booker Prize for fiction will be named Tuesday, winnowed from among the titles longlisted in July www.themanbookerprize.com/prize/thisyear/longlist. If Joseph O’Neill’s Netherland doesn’t make it, it will be a shocker that’s the literary equivalent of the Sarah Palin selection in reverse. It’s not so much that the book is one for the ages — though it’s the best 2008 novel I’ve read — but that it’s so much better than most Booker finalists. (Who can forget that the 2007 Man Booker judges gave us one finalist, Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip, that was written at a third-grade reading level? And that this was a frontrunner for the award that eventually went to The Gathering.) A review of and readers’ guide to Netherland appeared on this site on June 24 www.oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2008/06/24/. Check back around 5 p.m. Tuesday for the shortlist or a link to it.

*under a nom de guerre inspired by that of the late Las Vegas odds-maker Jimmy Snyder, better known as “Jimmy the Greek”

© 2008 Janice Harayda. All rights reserved.
www.janiceharayda.com

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