One-Minute Book Reviews

November 23, 2007

Ian McEwan Makes Longlist for Bad Sex in Fiction Award As Expected, Along With Norman Mailer and Jeanette Winterson

Read the list of the nominees for the 2007 Bad Sex in Fiction Award and the lines that may have qualified On Chesil Beach for it

By Janice Harayda

Call me Nostradamus.

Back in August, when a lot of people couldn’t stop praising Ian McEwan’s overrated On Chesil Beach, I wrote that “McEwan aggressively courts a Bad Sex in Fiction Award from the Literary Review” with the novel www.oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2007/08/10/. I raised the possibility of the Bad Sex Award again when McEwan made the shortlist for the 2007 Man Booker Prize for Fiction (“Does Ian McEwan Deserve the Man Booker Prize or a Bad Sex Award for Writing Like This? You Be the Judge”) www.oneminutebookreviews.wordpress.com/2007/09/07/.

The Literary Review has just announced the longlist for the 2007 Bad Sex Award, meant to “draw attention to the crude, tasteless, often perfunctory use of redundant passages of sexual description … and to discourage it” in modern literary novels (not pornograhy or erotica). And who’s on it? McEwan, along with Norman Mailer, Jeanette Winterson and others. Here’s the longlist:

Jeanette Winterson’s The Stone Gods

Ian McEwan’s On Chesil Beach

Richard Milward’s Apples

Ali Smith’s Girl Meets Boy

Maria Peura’s At the Edge of Light

James Delingpole’s Coward on the Beach

David Thewlis’s The Late Hector Kipling

Norman Mailer’s The Castle in the Forest

Quim Monzo’s The Enormity of the Tragedy

Gary Shteyngart’s Absurdistan

Christopher Rush’s Will

Claire Clark’s The Nature of Monsters

Nobody seems yet to have a list of the passages that won their authors a spot on the longlist for the award, the winner of which will be named on Nov. 27. But these lines from On Chesil Beach (Doubleday/Nan Talese, $22) quoted in my August 10 post, should have qualified McEwan easily (page 24 in the first U.S. edition):

“Like most young men of his time, or any time, without an easy manner, or means to sexual expression, he indulged constantly in what one enlightened authority was now calling ‘self-pleasuring’ … How extraordinary it was, that a self-made spoonful, leaping clear of his body, should instantly free his mind to confront afresh Nelson’s decisiveness at Aboukir Bay.”

Thanks to the Nov. 23 Literary Saloon www.complete-review.com/saloon/ for a link to a post on the Bookseller www.thebookseller.com that had the list. When is the Literary Review www.literaryreview.co.uk going to post the qualifying passages?

By the way, you can’t use the “Search Inside This Book” tool on Amazon www.amazon.com to find those lines from On Chesil Beach that I quoted, because the people at Doubleday/Nan Talese haven’t enabled it for the book. Those spoilsports.

Janice Harayda www.janiceharayda.com is an award-winning journalist who has been the book columnist for Glamour, the book editor of the Plain Dealer in Cleveland and a vice-president for awards of the National Book Critics Circle.

(c) 2007 Janice Harayda. All rights reserved.

Five Things I Learned About Alice Sebold’s Novel ‘The Almost Moon’ From the First Four Chapters

Filed under: Novels — 1minutebookreviewswordpresscom @ 2:04 am
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

… or why you may not want to read this one over lunch at Taco Bell

Yesterday I read the first 61 pages of Alice Sebold’s The Almost Moon on a train full holiday travelers. I’ll review it soon and, until then, here are five things I learned about the novel from four chapters:

1. Helen Knightly, the narrator, kills her mother in the first chapter. After the murder, Helen reflects, “For some reason I felt disloyal to her.”

2. Helen thinks while wrapping her mother’s corpse in blankets, “Super Giant Mother Burrito.”

3. Helen also imagines herself as a bronze statue, Middle-Aged Woman Ripping Underpants Off Dead Mother: “One could commission it for a schoolyard …”

4. Helen shares a surname with the hero of Emma, Mr. Knightley (sometimes spelled “Knightly”). I have no idea why. You don’t really think of “Jane Austen” and “Super Giant Mother Burrito” in the same breath, do you?

5. Helen describes herself as 49 years old and in “midlife.” So before the possibility of a nasty death sentence arose, she was planning to live to be about 98.

© 2007 Janice Harayda. All rights reserved.
www.janiceharayda.com

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