One-Minute Book Reviews

November 11, 2007

A Prayer Said by an Army Chaplain to Soldiers Leaving on a Fateful Mission in Iraq — Veterans’ Day Quote of the Day (Ramon Pena via Martha Raddatz in ‘The Long Road Home’)

On the day known as “Black Sunday,” Iraqi militants ambushed an American platoon escorting an Iraqi sewage truck in the Sadr City section of Baghdad. Convoys sent to rescue the stranded soldiers repeatedly came under attack, and the firefight left eight Americans dead and more than 60 wounded.

Martha Raddatz, an ABC News correspondent, tells the poignant story of that disastrous 2004 battle and its effect on the soldiers’ kin in her recent The Long Road Home: A Story of War and Family (Putnam, $24.95). In the opening scene Captain Ramon Pena, an Army chaplain, looks at the body of a 24-year-old soldier who died in the battle, his face covered by his T-shirt and camouflage top, and remembers the prayer he recited to the members of a rescue convoy an hour before:

“Lord, protect us. Give us the angels you have promised and bring peace to these soldiers as they go out. In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.”

Comment by Janice Harayda:

Many of the most moving scenes in military history or fiction involve the words said to soldiers who may soon die in battle. Some of the finest of these include King Henry V’s St. Crispin’s Day speech in Shakespeare’s Henry V (“We few, we happy few, we band of brothers”) and Cornelius Ryan’s account in The Longest Day of the invasion of Normandy, when loudspeakers on British ships broadcast over and over to men going ashore: “Remember Dunkirk! Remember Coventry! God bless you all.” What other messages deserve to be included in this category?

(c) 2007 Janice Harayda. All rights reserved.

2 Comments »

  1. I’d definitely say the “Freedom” speech from Mel Gibson’s Braveheart. You can refresh your memory.

    Comment by Sean Lindsay — November 23, 2007 @ 5:19 am | Reply

  2. This is a great link to a YouTube film clip of the “Freedom” speech. I hadn’t thought of that speech while writing the post, because I had mostly books and plays on my mind and because Braveheart” takes so many liberties with history (which, of course, Shakespeare did, too).

    But I watched the clip you linked to, and it fits well in this context. I may expand or bring back this post and your comment on Memorial Day (observed on May 26 in 2008). Thanks, Sean.

    Comment by 1minutebookreviewswordpresscom — November 23, 2007 @ 11:59 am | Reply


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